Tuesday, December 29, 2020

Sweet Dreams (Musings on the benefits of a well-rounded education)

Updated:  24 Aug. 2021 (Fixed errors)

No blog for a few months but wanted to write one for the end of 2020 and specifically the holiday season. December’s blog will discuss the benefits of a well-rounded medical laboratory science education. But I hope that the blog’s theme rings true for all transfusion medicine professionals.

The idea for the blog was stimulated by a message I wrote last year for an alumni reception of the MLS program I once taught in. As I couldn’t attend the Director asked me to send a greeting that she would read out. I’ve adapted it to a blog format and omitted some personal memories and the names of those MLS grads I mentioned.

NOTE: Often MLS grads from the 1990s could not find jobs due to Alberta's Conservative government cutting clinical lab funding by 40%. (See Further Reading) Many were forced to seek work in the USA and overseas. Some decided to change careers. In both cases they had the soft skills needed to succeed: love of learning, communication skills, and the ability and skills to be lifelong learners.

The blog's title derives from a song co-written by Annie Lennox and originally released by the Eurythmics in 1983.

INTRODUCTION

Greeting to all Med Lab Science grads, no matter when you graduated. The oldster has two messages for all of you. First, I must tell you a bit about myself, but only so that you will appreciate - once you hear my messages - that I know what I'm talking about. In brief, I know the international scene in medical lab science well. Some examples (I excluded several others):

  • Founded a mailing list in 1994, MEDLAB-L, which became the world's largest English language mailing list for med lab professionals in all disciplines: 2400+ subscribers in 50 countries.
  • Still a list manager, albeit a silent one in the background, for CLSEDUC-L, the mailing list of U.S. clin lab science educators in all disciplines. All the leading educators are members, including textbook authors.
  • For decades I’ve been the webmaster for the TraQ website of the BC Provincial Blood Coordinating Office which distributes a monthly newsletter to 1000s of transfusion professionals all over the world. 

ANECDOTES 

1. In the 1990s medical laboratory technologist positions became scarce in Alberta due to severe government cutbacks. Many MLS grads went to work in the U.S. as they had written ASCP (MT) examinations when they graduated. I know from my extensive contacts there that MLS grads were highly valued and considered excellent. One reason of several was their long internship in clinical labs. The clinical rotation is shorter now, pretty much everywhere.

2. Several also worked in NZ for its national Blood Transfusion Service. To facilitate that adventure, I sent copies of the MLS curriculum to the NZ registration body. The NZBS runs blood centres and also pretransfusion testing laboratories.  

3. In the 1990s out-of-the-blue I was contacted by a company (Wyndgate Technologies, now part of Haemonetics) in Sacramento, California who made software for transfusion labs. The company had given a demonstration of their LIS software to staff in Hamilton, NZ for the New Zealand Blood Service. They were so impressed by the 5 MLS grads working there that they wanted to know if MLS had any more like that. 

Turns out two grads were game and worked for the company for many years, travelling all over the U.S. demonstrating the software for new clients. One was a NAIT graduate, who took MLS’s degree-completion program for technologists with general certification from CSMLS

WHERE LIFE TAKES US

In MLS you obtained 3 main skills:

  1. Extensive knowledge in all MLS disciplines; 
  2. Sound practical training in clinical labs;
  3. Priceless so-called 'soft skills' that are transferable to many occupations, especially communication skills and the ability to be a lifelong learner.

To me it's always been the third that's most valuable because we never know where life will take us. Most MLS grads went on to long careers in clinical labs, where many became supervisors and managers. Some rose to high positions in healthcare organizations.

Other MLS grads followed different paths. Some got post-secondary Masters or PhDs and became researchers, Deans in technical institutes and universities. Several became MDs and rose to high positions in healthcare. Others became lawyers, nurses, dentists, physical therapists, investment brokers, real estate agents, sales representatives, information system specialists.

I’ll highlight but one MLS grad: Susan was born in AB to immigrant parents and when she entered grade one she spoke only Chinese. She worked in her parents’ modest restaurant, as did her sisters. After working as a med lab technologist Susan became a lawyer and progressed to be a tax specialist who was the Regional Director at the Department of Justice Canada in Vancouver. Susan was appointed a judge of the Tax Court of Canada by Canada’s Governor General and now has the title Honorable as part of her name.

LEARNING POINTS

#1: As an MLS graduate be aware that your hard work has resulted in graduating from one of the world's top medical lab science programs. Not just top Canadian MLS program, but one of the world's finest MLS programs. As someone active on the international scene for decades, I can attest to this. 

Concrete Evidence: In 1998 MLS won a worldwide competition to put on a 5-day seminar in Saudi Arabia for the healthcare division of Saudi Aramco (Saudi Arabia's national oil company). 

#2: With an MLS degree you can become anything. You can work as a med lab technologist in Canada, the USA, and beyond or get further education in any field. 

Indeed, most of my 'kids' work as medical lab technologists in labs across Canada, not just in Alberta but literally from coast to coast to coast, including New Brunswick in the east, BC in the west, and Whitehorse, Yukon. As such they make important contributions to Canada's healthcare system. Yes, I'm incredibly proud of all my 'kids'. 

But if you want to, with an MLS BSc - and being skilled lifelong learners - you can take further education and enter any profession. The sky's the limit. You have the education to be FUTURE LEADERS in wherever life takes you. Never forget it.

SECRET TO SUCCESS

Regardless of the health profession it’s the so-called 'soft skills' that are transferable to many occupations, especially communication skills and the ability to be a lifelong learner. Not all the facts you have learned, though they are important to being a competent health practitioner.

PHOTOS OF SOME OF MY MLS 'KIDS' (Most taken by me)

  • Wish I could include many more, but for now this is it.
  • Dr. Carol E, BSc (MLS), PhD (medical microbiology) & MD (anatomic pathologist), RAH at Edmonton Pride Parade 

  • Colleen Y, BSc (MLS),worked for CBS for years, & currently Macopharma marketing Manager in Lille, France 

  • Brenda M, BSc (MLS),longtime medical lab technologist, University of Alberta Hospital 
  • Francene S, BSc (MLS) longtime medical lab technologist (Dynalife)
  • Liz M, BSc (MLS), medical lab technologist,UAH, who became Director of Accreditation at College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta & more.
  • Sonja C, BSc (MLS), MEd (Post-secondary Studies), clinical instructor in MLS, now Dean, School of Health and Public Safety at SAIT
  • Chris W, BSc (MLS), MEd, now Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Dept. Lab Med & Pathol, Division of MLS, who teaches multiple transfusion science and immunology courses, plus is involved in a multidisciplinary UAlberta course. Earlier he worked in multi-discipline 'core lab' then got my job and volunteered for CSMLS on exam panel when that was allowed.

  • Lisa D, BSc (MLS), ART(CSMLS), MT (ASCP) SBB, Learning management specialist at DynaLIFE Medical Labs 

  • Judy W, BSc (MLS), longtime medical technologist at CBS (photo of me & Judy)

  • Lisa P, BSc (MLS), MSc (medical microbiology & immunolgy)
    • First non-physician, non-PhD Director of MLS;
    • Assistant Dean, Graduate Student Affairs, Office of Advocacy & Wellbeing at University of Alberta

  • Anne H, BSc (MLS), MT (ASCP), MSc, Trinity College, Dublin, (Community Health/Public Health), PhD candidate UAlberta (transplant immunology);
  • Dr. Craig K, BSc (MLS), Bachelor of Commerce (Management Information Systems), PhD (Health Information Science); 
    • University Research Chair in Healthcare Innovation, UOttawa; 
  • Current position: Associate Vice-President, Research, MacEwan University
  • Dr. Susan N, BSc (MLS), MD +Hematopathology certification, University of Alberta; 
    • 2020 Physician of the Year for Edmonton Zone Medical Staff Association; 
    • Medical Director, Transfusion Medicine at Alberta Health Services;
    • Section Chief/ Divisional Director for the AHS Edmonton Zone Transfusion Medicine Service;
    • Deputy Clinical Department Head for Laboratory Medicine and Pathology
    • Member of the Alberta Blood Office Collaborative (ABOC)
    • Canada's National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products (NAC) 
    • International Collaborative for Transfusion Medicine Guidelines (ICTMG).
  • Photo of me & Susan 

  • Jodi M, BSc (MLS); 
  • Quality Control Manager, Alberta Research Council
  • Quality Control Analyst, KS Avicenna Inc.
  • Founder & President of Keystone Labs Inc. (2005-present) 
  •                             


    • Shelly C, BSc (MLS), LL.B, admitted to the Alberta Bar;
    • Current position: Partner at Reynolds Mirth Richards & Farmer LLP
    • Volunteer and leadership experience:
      • Past President, Youth Empowerment and Support Services (YESS) Board of Directors (2003 - 2012);
      • Presenter, Edmonton Community Foundation;
      • Lecturer, Legal Education Society of Alberta;
      • Past Presenter, Metro Continuing Education, Edmonton Public Schools.
    • Prior work experience:
      • Regional Coordinator for Edmonton's then Capital Health Authority, Department of Laboratory Medicine;
      • Worked as a medical laboratory technologist in Saudi Arabia;
      • Worked with a humanitarian aid project (Osvita medical project) in Kyiv, Ukraine. 
    • Photo of me and group of Canadian medical technologists in Oslo, 1996 for a world congress. Shelly is third from the right, next to my spouse. 

    • Dr. Gordon C, BSc (MLS), PhD (medical biochemistry);
                                                  
    • Roberta M, BSc (MLS), MT(ASCP), MEd (Adult education) Work history:
      • Clinical Labs of Hawaii
      • University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Dept. Lab Med & Pathol, Division of MLS - MLS instructor (Clinical Chemistry)
      • Current positions: Associate Professor and MLS Program Coordinator, University of Alberta, Division of MLS 
        • Instructing in Histology, Foundations of Instrumentation and Laboratory Management
                                               

  • Darcy F, BSc (MLS), MT (ASCP) Work history: 
  • Medical Technologist, Associated Pathologist Laboratories 
  • Implementation Specialist, Sunquest Information Systems
  • Implementation Specialist, Misys Healthcare Systems
  • Business Systems Advisor, Dell Services/NTT DATA Services 
  • Current position: Sr. Business Analyst - LIS at Verity Health System
  • Enterprise Application Administrator III, MultiCare Health System 
  •  


    Stay tuned
    ...more graduates to come.

    As always comments are most welcome and there are some.

    Addendum: Please see my latest blog, which is related to this one: I will remember you (Musings on a 1991 graduation speech)

    FOR FUN

    FURTHER READING

    2 comments:

    1. Hi Pat,
      Amazing potted history! So many wonderful achievements including helping others in theirs - you should be extremely proud :)
      Sorry it's been a while but I do think of you often...
      Best wishes, Robina

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thanks, Robina. Very kind comment. Personal note: My goodness, it's so good to hear from you. Hope you & yours are surviving COVID-19 & are well. Happy 2021, my friend.

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